The company that publishes Dr. Seuss’ children’s books said it will stop selling six of his titles because they contain racist and insensitive images.

Dr. Seuss Enterprises — the firm charged with preserving and protecting the beloved author’s legacy — told the Associated Press that it decided to scrap the books because they “portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong.”

“Ceasing sales of these books is only part of our commitment and our broader plan to ensure Dr. Seuss Enterprises’ catalog represents and supports all communities and families,” the company told the outlet in a statement Tuesday, which is also the author’s birthday.

The affected titles reportedly include “If I Ran the Zoo,” “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street,” “McElligot’s Pool,” “On Beyond Zebra!,” “Scrambled Eggs Super!” and “The Cat’s Quizzer.”

Courtney Keating, education coordinator of The Literacy Center in Evansville, Ind., reads "If I Ran the Zoo," By Dr. Seuss
A Virginia school district also ordered its teachers to avoid linking Read Across America Day with Seuss because research has shown “strong racial undertones” in many of his books.
AP

While Dr. Seuss — whose real name was Theodor Seuss Geisel — remains one of the world’s most popular children’s authors three decades after his death, his books have come under fire in recent years for how they portray black people, Asian people and other groups.

President Biden avoided mentioning Dr. Seuss in his presidential proclamation for Read Across America Day, which is celebrated on the author’s birthday.

A Virginia school district also ordered its teachers to avoid linking Read Across America Day with Seuss because research has shown “strong racial undertones” in many of his books.

“Dr. Seuss Enterprises listened and took feedback from our audiences including teachers, academics and specialists in the field as part of our review process,” the company told the AP. “We then worked with a panel of experts, including educators, to review our catalog of titles.”

With Post Wires

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