RIO GRANDE VALLEY, Texas — Unlawful crossings by migrants into the Rio Grande Valley are set to nearly double in March, Customs and Border Protection numbers show — as the southern border continues to grapple with an immigration crisis on pace to be the worst in 20 years.

CBP’s Rio Grande Valley sector saw the majority of southwest border crossings in February, with 27,913 unaccompanied kids, families and single adults making their way into the region from Mexico, data shows

As of Thursday, those numbers were set to nearly double for March after CBP recorded more than 34,000 crossings in just 19 days, including more than 10,000 in a single week, Chief Patrol Agent Brian Hastings wrote on Twitter

“RGV agents remained busy on Thursday, apprehending over 2000 illegal aliens. Thursday’s encounters pushed RGV’s weekly total over 10K apprehensions! March monthly totals are now over 34K for #RGV Sector alone,” Hastings wrote. 

An undocumented immigrant detained by Border Patrol agents on December 11, 2021.
An undocumented immigrant detained by Border Patrol agents on December 11, 2021.
John Moore/Getty Images

At that pace, which is about 1,789 migrants a day, the valley alone could see upwards of 55,000 total crossings in March, nearly double the amount seen in February and more than the entire southwest border saw in every month of Fiscal Year 2020 except for September. 

The Rio Grande Valley sector, which oversees 277 miles along the river separating Texas from Mexico and 316 miles of coastline along the Gulf of Mexico, has proven to be the busiest crossing point for migrants in Fiscal Year 2021.

Between the year’s start in October and February, the region has seen over 25 percent of all unlawful crossings along the entire southwest border from San Diego, California to Brownsville, Texas. 

By comparison, Tucson, El Paso and Del Rio have seen 16 percent, 14 percent and 13 percent of total crossings, respectively. 

Border Patrol agents with detained undocumented immigrants near Mission, Texas on December 11, 2019.
Border Patrol agents with detained undocumented immigrants near Mission, Texas on December 11, 2019.
John Moore/Getty Images

Local law enforcement officers and public officials on the ground in the Rio Grande Valley have described a spiraling crisis that’s getting worse as the days pass. 

After President Biden was elected and rolled back strict immigration policies set in place by his predecessor, migrants rushed towards the border, which is lacking in manpower as many agents have been diverted to processing centers to manage the influx. 

While the Rio Grande Valley has always been a busy section of the border, the sector is seeing a record number of family units stream past the line, accounting for over 42 percent of all parents and children who’ve crossed so far this fiscal year.

The Rio Grande river near Sanderson, Texas on January 20, 2020.
The Rio Grande river near Sanderson, Texas on January 20, 2020.
AFP via Getty Images

That’s largely in part to a new Mexican law that prevents the country from accepting migrants traveling with young children who would typically be expelled under Title 42, a Trump-era regulation that allowed CBP to immediately deport migrants to stem the spread of COVID-19.

“They figured out that if they have a child with 6 years or under, they will not be sent back,” Sister Norma Pimentel, who runs the Catholic Charities Respite Center in downtown McAllen, Tex. told The Post. 

“Border Patrol cannot return any child under the age of 6 to Mexico and so therefore, they’re forced to release them into United States… [that’s] why we’re seeing so many.”

Migrants climbing an embankment after crossing the Rio Grande on March 17, 2021.
Migrants climbing an embankment after crossing the Rio Grande on March 17, 2021.
John Moore/Getty Images

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