Nevada is taking a gamble on becoming the first state of the Democratic primaries in 2024.

A new law signed by Democratic Gov. Steve Sisolak would bump off Iowa and New Hampshire from their traditional spots in the nominating contest. The primary would be on the first Tuesday in February in the year of the presidential election.

“Nevada represents a diverse constituency that presidential candidates need to talk to. It is not just for us. It is for candidates to vet their issues and communicate with the kind of communities that they’re going to be asking to vote for them in the national presidential election,” Jason Frierson, the Nevada speaker of the House said Friday during a bill signing, ABC News reported.

The new law also formally changed Nevada from a caucus to a state-run primary, continuing a trend of phasing out the frequently unwieldy, party-run nominating process.

Nevada — which is more racially and ethnically diverse than Iowa and New Hampshire — has long angled to supplant their preeminence in the nominating contests, but the gambit comes with risks.

Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak
A new law signed by Democratic Gov. Steve Sisolak would bump off Iowa and New Hampshire.
AP

Iowa and New Hampshire could potentially move to pass laws of their own to protect their status. The Granite State already has a state law requiring them to hold their contest at least seven days before any other primary.

The Democratic National Committee has also not weighed in on the issue and likely won’t for at least a year.

Las Vegas
The new law also formally changed Nevada from a caucus to a state-run primary.
Getty Images/iStockphoto



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